DeGroft says Isle of Wight employees paid enough

By Ryan Kushner

Staff writer

RUSHMERE—Past controversies and some personal accusations surfaced during the first public forum between the candidates vying to represent the Hardy District on the Isle of Wight County Board of Supervisors, the only race in the county with two competing candidates on the ballot this November.

Incumbent Rudolph Jefferson is currently seeking a second four-year term in the supervisor seat that represents the only minority-majority district in the county, with former School Board member Herb DeGroft running as his challenger.

During the meeting, which was hosted by the Isle of Wight County branch of the NAACP Monday, Sept. 11, DeGroft pledged to fight for tighter management of personnel costs in the county, handing out a 2015 salary comparison sheet that claimed the county paid its administrators some of the highest salaries in the region. 

This section of the article is only available for our subscribers. Please log in or subscribe In order to view this part of the article.

 

 

DeGroft says Isle of Wight employees paid enough

By Ryan Kushner

 

Staff writer

RUSHMERE—Past controversies and some personal accusations surfaced during the first public forum between the candidates vying to represent the Hardy District on the Isle of Wight County Board of Supervisors, the only race in the county with two competing candidates on the ballot this November.

Incumbent Rudolph Jefferson is currently seeking a second four-year term in the supervisor seat that represents the only minority-majority district in the county, with former School Board member Herb DeGroft running as his challenger.

During the meeting, which was hosted by the Isle of Wight County branch of the NAACP Monday, Sept. 11, DeGroft pledged to fight for tighter management of personnel costs in the county, handing out a 2015 salary comparison sheet that claimed the county paid its administrators some of the highest salaries in the region. 

This section of the article is only available for our subscribers. Please log in or subscribe In order to view this part of the article.

0 0 1 2 17 The Smithfield Times 1 1 18 14.0

Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE

/* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:12.0pt; font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-font-family:Cambria; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-hansi-font-family:Cambria; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

 

By Diana McFarland

Managing editor

The discussion of whether Confederate monuments should stay or go continues, and a key argument for their removal has been based on the assertion by the Southern Poverty Law Center that many went up during the start of the Jim Crow and Civil Rights eras to assert the authority of southern whites over blacks.

The flurry of monument-raising occurred around those two periods of history, according to “Whose Heritage: Public Symbols of the Confederacy,” published by the Southern Poverty Law Center. 

But fewer and fewer people alive today remember the Jim Crow laws in the south, which sprung up after Plessy vs. Ferguson in 1896 declared laws ordering mandatory segregation to be constitutional, and after the U.S. Supreme Court declared the Civil Rights Act of 1875 to be unconstitutional. Many today probably do even not know where the name Jim Crow, which represented discrimination and segregation against blacks, came from.* 

This section of the article is only available for our subscribers. Please log in or subscribe In order to view this part of the article.

    

By Diana McFarland

Managing editor

SURRY — Surry’s Confederate statue will remain. For now.

Surry County attorney Brendan Hefty said the Board of Supervisors has no authority to move the statue, which stands in front of the circuit court building, based on current Virginia law.

“The county currently does not have the authority under state law to disturb, remove or interfere with that monument,” he said Thursday at the Surry Board of Supervisors meeting. 

This section of the article is only available for our subscribers. Please log in or subscribe In order to view this part of the article.

 

 

Residents ask supervisors for help

By Ryan Kushner

Staff writer

ZUNI—When rural meets industrial, things can become tense.

Fire Tower Road, a narrow, winding road in Zuni, has become a prime example of that clash for many of its residents.

A petition submitted to the Isle of Wight County Board of Supervisors that garnered more than 200 signatures itemizes a number of dilemmas with the roughly six-mile stretch of road, a primary one being its frequent usage by tractor trailers as a shortcut to Windsor Boulevard (Rt. 460), which is often bustling with business traffic. 

This section of the article is only available for our subscribers. Please log in or subscribe In order to view this part of the article.

 

 

 

By Diana McFarland

Managing editor

Whether to construct two new buildings at Windsor Castle Park came down to a 2-1 vote by the Smithfield Town Council Sept. 5.

After initially calling the motion a failure, town attorney William Riddick said he would check with the clerk of the General Assembly to see if the vote is legally binding, given that four council members declined to vote, but Riddick added that they were not required to abstain.

After consulting with the clerk of the General Assembly, it was determined the vote was valid, according to Town Clerk Lesley King.

“There’s no conflict here whatsoever,” said Riddick in a phone interview, referring to the decision by council members Connie Chapman, Andrew Gregory, Randy Pack and Mayor Carter Williams’ not to vote due to their ties to activities at Windsor Castle Park. 

This section of the article is only available for our subscribers. Please log in or subscribe In order to view this part of the article.

 

 

By Ryan Kushner

Staff writer

SURRY—After major security concerns were brought to light over the summer, DRE voting machines used by Surry County were decommissioned by the Virginia Department of Elections Friday.

In anticipation of the decommissioning, the Surry County Board of Supervisors voted Thursday to replace its compromised machines with eight new DS200 voting machines, to be used in the upcoming November election. The payment of $82,999 for the new election equipment will be deferred by the county until July 2018. 

This section of the article is only available for our subscribers. Please log in or subscribe In order to view this part of the article.

 

 

 

The Smithfield Community Blood Drive is Thursday, Sept. 14, noon to 6 p.m. at Trinity United Methodist Church, 201 Cedar St. in Smithfield. The blood drive and food canteen sponsor will be the United Methodist Women of TUMC.

Summer supplies run critically low. Schedule a time at 1-800-733-2767, www.redcrossblood.org, or the Red Cross blood donor app in the Google Play or iPhone App stores.

 

Town Council cool to complete closure

By Diana McFarland

Managing editor

State officials are eying late 2020 as the year that work begins on repairing the Cypress Creek Bridge in Smithfield, according to Town Manager Peter Stephenson.

The project was discussed at an Aug. 29 Smithfield Town Council Committee meeting.

Stephenson said VDOT was looking for feedback on two options — to either close the bridge for the duration of the project or set up traffic signals that would facilitate leaving one lane of traffic open.

To replace the bridge using the complete shutdown option would take 11-12 months, while the one-lane option would cause the project to take 18-24 months to complete, Stephenson said. 

This section of the article is only available for our subscribers. Please log in or subscribe In order to view this part of the article.

 

 

Subcategories

Never miss an issue, even the ones you already have. Download previous digital versions of The Smithfield Times here.

Edna Felts Myers

 

Edna Felts Myers, 96, passed away on Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2015 in her home. She is preceded in death by her husband, Luther Power Myers. Edna leaves to cherish her memories her son, Robert Hall. A graveside service will be held Friday, Aug. 7, 11 a.m. in St. Luke’s Memorial Park with the Rev. Mike Frank officiating. A special thank you to Marilyn Oliver and Joe Brown for all their love and support. The family request memorial contributions to VFW POST 8545, PO Box 461, Smithfield, VA 23431.

Service arrangements are in the care of Colonial Funeral Home, Carrollton, Smithfield, Isle of Wight and the surrounding communities.  Family and friends are encouraged to share condolences and remembrances at colonialfuneralhomesmithfield.com.

The current Classifieds Listings here.

The latest legal listings in The Smithfield Times 

Mr. Edwards' Short rows Column

x